Area Associations

Each Washington State conservation district belongs to an area association. At least once a year, each area association meets to discuss conservation issues and to seek consensus on matters to bring to the annual statewide meeting of WACD. Each area association has its own set of bylaws. A map of these areas is available on the Washington State Conservation Commission website.

Eastern Washington Region

The Northeast Area Association of Conservation Districts and the Southeast Area Association of Conservation Districts cover the far eastern Washington region.

The climate in this region is marked by dry summers and cold, crisp winters. The northern portion of this region is forested. Remnant pockets of drought-tolerant trees survive in valleys and pockets in the southern part of this region, where low summer rainfall and drying winds limit the success of most trees and shrubs. Some of the most productive soils exist in southeast Washington, where despite low annual rainfall, local farms produce large quantities of food.

Natural resource uses include dryland and irrigated agriculture, livestock production, timber harvesting, and a variety of outdoor recreation activities.

 

Central Washington Region

The North-Central Area Association of Conservation Districts and the South-Central Area Association of Conservation Districts cover the central Washington region, bordered to the east by the eastern Washington region and to the west by the crest of the Cascade Mountain Range.

The climate in this region is marked by dry summers and cold, crisp winters.

 

Western Washington Region

Southwest Area Association, 2008

The Northwest Area Association of Conservation Districts and the Southwest Area Association of Conservation Districts cover the western Washington region, bordered to the east by the crest of the Cascade Mountain Range and to the west by the Pacific Ocean.

The climate in this region is influenced by its proximity to the Pacific Ocean. Summers are generally cool, and winter temperatures are not as cold and dry as seen in eastern Washington.